Clinical Associate Professor
and MA Program Coordinator

Research Question

How does social context influence the boundary between normality and pathology?

Research

My research interests are in clinical and social psychology, with a focus on how social context influences the boundary between normality and pathology. I investigate social factors that might affect the onset of, and recovery from, mental illness. Currently, I am studying auditory verbal hallucinations, and I am particularly interested in examining the similarities and differences in hallucinatory experiences between clinical and non-clinical populations. Although research studies of voice hearing experiences in people without diagnosable disorders have been published for several decades, there is limited discussion of this literature in the media and in popular culture, which tend to associate voice hearing experiences with serious mental illness and criminality. My work addresses the way such an association might affect people who experience auditory hallucinations. In addition to public perceptions of voice hearing, I study the phenomenology of voice hearing in various social/cultural contexts, and the relationship between auditory verbal hallucinations and normal inner speech. I use both quantitative and qualitative approaches.

My previous research focused on the psychosocial experiences of women with metastatic breast cancer, particularly with respect to their participation in psychotherapy groups and online support groups.

Biography

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Chicago (Psychology: Human Development and Mental Health Research)
  • M.A., University of Chicago (Social Sciences)
  • M.A., University of Texas at Austin (Biology)
  • B.S., University of Texas at Austin (Biology)

I am a licensed clinical psychologist. Before joining NYU, I was Professor of Psychology and Department Chair at Felician University in New Jersey. In addition to my Psychology research, I have an interest in creative writing. I have received several literary awards and honors, and my work has been broadcast on BBC radio and published in many literary journals.

Personal website: www.ruvaneevilhauer.com

Selected Publications

Vilhauer, R. P. (2015). Inner reading voices: an overlooked form of inner speech. Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches DOI:10.1080/17522439.2015.1028972.

Vilhauer, R. P. (2015). Depictions of auditory verbal hallucinations in news media. International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 61(1), 58-63. doi:10.1177/0020764014535757.

Vilhauer, R. P. (2014). Computer-mediated and face-to-face communication in metastatic cancer support groups. Palliative & Supportive Care, 12(4), 287-297. doi:10.1017/S1478951513000126.

Petro-Nustas, W., Norton, M., Vilhauer, R.P. and Connelly, A. (2012). Health beliefs associated with breast cancer screening among Arab women in the Northeastern United States. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 50 (6):273-277.

Vilhauer, R.P. (2011). ‘Them’ and ‘us’: the experiences of women with metastatic disease in mixed-stage versus stage-specific breast cancer support groups. Psychology & Health, 26 (6): 781-797. doi:10.1080/08870446.2010.496853.

Vilhauer, R.P. , McClintock, M.K., & Matthews, A. K. (2010). Online support groups for women with metastatic breast cancer: a feasibility pilot study. Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 28(5): 560-586. Vilhauer, R. P. (2010). Life-threatening illness and the family. In Craft-Rosenberg, M. (Ed.), Sage Encyclopedia of Family Health. Los Angeles: Sage.

Vilhauer, R.P. (2009). Perceived benefits of online support groups for women with metastatic breast cancer. Women & Health, 49(5): 381-404.

Vilhauer, R.P. (2008). A qualitative study of the experiences of women with metastatic breast cancer. Palliative and Supportive Care 6(3): 249-258.

Vilhauer, R. P. (2008). Bereavement. In Fundukian, L.J. & Wilson, J. (Ed.), Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Health, (2nd ed.) Gale.

Vilhauer, R.P. (2012). Reading Our Lives: The Poetics of Growing Old by Randall, W.A. and McKim, E.A. (2008). New York: Oxford University Press. Journal of Women & Aging, 24 (4):353-354.

Vilhauer, R. P. (2008). Antidepressants. In Fundukian, L.J. & Wilson, J. (Ed.), Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Health, (2nd ed.) Gale.

Vilhauer, R. P. (2008). Anosognosia. In Fundukian, L.J. & Wilson, J. (Ed.), Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Health, (2nd ed.) Gale.

Vilhauer, R. P. (2008). Premenstrual Syndrome. In Fundukian, L.J. & Wilson, J. (Ed.), Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Health, (2nd ed.) Gale.

Vilhauer, R. P. (2008). Ecstasy. In Fundukian, L.J. & Wilson, J. (Ed.), Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Health, (2nd ed.) Gale.

Vilhauer, R. P. (2008). Neuropsychiatry. In Fundukian, L.J. & Wilson, J. (Ed.), Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Health, (2nd ed.) Gale.

Frey, R. & Vilhauer, R. P. (2008). Alzheimer’s Disease. In Fundukian, L.J. & Wilson, J. (Ed.), Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Health, (2nd ed.) Gale.

Vilhauer, R. P. (2008). Pick’s Disease. In Fundukian, L.J. & Wilson, J. (Ed.), Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Health, (2nd ed.) Gale.


Address

Ruvanee Vilahuer
Clinical Associate Professor
Coordinator, M.A. Program in Psychology

Department of Psychology
New York University
6 Washington Place, Room 404
New York, NY 10003
Phone: (212) 998-7802
Email: ruvanee.vilhauer@nyu.edu

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